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"I do not believe that civilization will be wiped out in a war fought with the atomic bomb. Perhaps two-thirds of the people of the Earth might be killed, but enough men capable of thinking, and enough books, would be left to start again, and civilization could be restored."

—Albert Einstein (1875-1955) German-born American theoretical physicist, theories of relativity, philosopher

 

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Novelist Mat Johnson Explores The 'Optical Illusion' Of Being Biracial 
  Sun, 24 May 2015 07:27:00 -0400 
    Johnson, the son of an African-American mother and an Irish-American father, has just written Loving Day, a funny, sometimes absurd look at what it means to grow up mixed heritage in the U.S.


This Weekend, Navigate The Changing World Of 'Vikram Lall' 
  Sun, 24 May 2015 05:45:34 -0400 
    M.G. Vassanji's book, The In-Between World of Vikram Lall, wrestles with questions of identity in a story about a young Indian boy coming of age in 1950s Kenya, a time of great political unrest.


What If The Drought Doesn't End? 'The Water Knife' Is One Possibility 
  Sat, 23 May 2015 21:48:00 -0400 
    It's Chinatown meets Mad Max in writer Paolo Bacigalupi's new desert dystopia, filled with climate refugees, powerful state border patrols, and secret agents called water knives.


'Mislaid' Punctures Notions Of Gender And Race 
  Sat, 23 May 2015 07:54:00 -0400 
    In Nell Zink's new book, Mislaid, a young woman marries her male professor. It's 1965. She likes women; he likes men. What follows is a biting satire about gender, race and sexuality.


'Dietland': A 'Fight Club' For Women That Reclaims The Word 'Fat' 
  Sat, 23 May 2015 07:54:00 -0400 
    Sarai Walker's new novel centers on Alicia "Plum" Kettle, a 20-something writer who's saving up for weight loss surgery when she joins an underground feminist collective.


How 'Gatsby' Went From A Moldering Flop To A Great American Novel 
  Fri, 22 May 2015 15:36:00 -0400 
    In So We Read On, Maureen Corrigan looks at the story behind The Great Gatsby, from F. Scott Fitzgerald's life to the era in which it's set. Originally broadcast Sept. 8, 2014.


In 'Out Of Line,' The Many, Many Acts Of Jules Feiffer 
  Tue, 19 May 2015 17:52:00 -0400 
    At 86, Jules Feiffer has drawn comic strips, written books and plays, and is now experimenting with graphic novels. A new compilation, Out of Line, takes an extensive look at his many careers.


How Heroin Made Its Way From Rural Mexico To Small-Town America 
  Tue, 19 May 2015 03:23:00 -0400 
    With pizza delivery as a model, Mexican cartels revolutionized the heroin trade, making it easily available in smaller U.S. communities. Journalist Sam Quinones has the story in his new book.


Cherokee Chief John Ross Is The Unsung Hero Of 'Jacksonland' 
  Tue, 19 May 2015 03:22:00 -0400 
    Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep's new book examines a dark chapter in American history: the Cherokee Trail of Tears and the chief who used the tools of democracy to try to protect his people.


Attention White-Collar Workers: The Robots Are Coming For Your Jobs 
  Mon, 18 May 2015 14:05:00 -0400 
    The machines have long been used in manufacturing, but Martin Ford, author of Rise of the Robots, says they're now poised to replace humans as teachers, lawyers and even journalists.


'The Gracekeepers' Sets Damplings Against The Landlockers 
  Sun, 17 May 2015 08:19:00 -0400 
    The world of The Gracekeepers has two types of people — those of the land and those of the sea. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Kirsty Logan about her novel, set in a future enveloped by water.


Call It A Prose Ceremony: 'Bachelor' Host Writes A Novel 
  Sat, 16 May 2015 17:38:00 -0400 
    Chris Harrison's new book is an amusing romance novel — and a ripe excuse for us to ask some lingering questions about the reality show juggernaut that's made him famous.


A Fortune In Folios: One Man's Hunt For Shakespeare's First Editions 
  Thu, 14 May 2015 03:24:00 -0400 
    Henry Folger once spent nearly a year's salary on a William Shakespeare first folio. In The Millionaire and the Bard, Andrea Mays chronicles his obsession with collecting the playwright's work.


'Nimona' Shifts Shape And Takes Names — In Sensible Armor, Of Course 
  Wed, 13 May 2015 16:33:00 -0400 
    Comics creator Noelle Stevenson has written for Boom! Studios and Marvel's new female Thor. Her webcomic Nimona, about a young shapeshifter with a streak of villainy, has just been released as a book.


Tom Brokaw Reflects On Cancer, 'Nightly News' And His 'Lucky Life' 
  Wed, 13 May 2015 14:53:00 -0400 
    The former NBC anchorman says his multiple myeloma diagnosis two years ago made him "more conscious of the fact that the days are more numbered." His new memoir is A Lucky Life Interrupted.
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